The Center

The Clinical and Experimental Center for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (GCS-fMRI, formerly CCS-fMRI) was set up in 2003 by prof. Giuliano Geminiani and dr. Sergio Duca.

The Director is Dr. Sergio Duca, head of the Neuroradiology Unit at the Koelliker Hospital in Turin.

The Neuroimaging Group Coordinator is Prof. Franco Cauda, Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Turin.

The Computational Neuroscience Group Coordinator is Dr. Tommaso Costa, Assistant Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Turin.

Between 2012 and 2015, the GCS-fMRI Coordinator was Prof. Franco Cauda, Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Turin.

Until 2012, the CCS-fMRI Coordinator was Prof. Katiuscia Sacco, Now Associate Professor at the Department of Psychology, University of Turin.

The Center is the result of a partnership between the Department of Psychology (University of Turin) and the Neuroradiology Department (Koelliker Hospital in Turin). As a research facility, it is also part of the Interdepartmental Center for Advanced Studies in Neuroscience of the University of Turin (NIT - Neuroscience Institute of Turin), and the Center for Molecular Imaging of the University of Turin (CIM). The GCS-fMRI is dedicated to clinical and experimental neuroscience research. Its main goal is to investigate brain connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging, as the basis for heuristics and practical guidelines. Since 2015 it is achieved by the collaboration of two different Labs, approaching the matter from different perspectives:

The Neuroimaging Group, that investigates brain connectivity and pathoconnectomics using functional magnetic resonance imaging, as the basis for heuristics and practical guidelines.

The Computational Neuroscience Group, that develops new methods and models based on the statistical mechanics of neural networks and their computational properties. In particular, it develops models and utilizes them (I) to detect functional connectivity in functional data, (II) to investigate the nature of the biological signal (mainly the BOLD signal) and their intrinsic properties with random walk and diffusion models of biological signals, and (III) to examine their functional difference in different conditions.

We use both anatomical, functional as well as metaanalytic imaging techniques. Anatomical techniques include morphometric analysis (in particular, Voxel-Based Morphometry, VBM), and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). Functional techniques include functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation, resting state and metaanalytic sources of data. Starting from these sources we employ functional and effective connectivity, graph theoretical, multivariate pattern recognition and data mining methods to study brain functions in healthy and pathological populations.

Our research projects have attracted funding from various institutions and foundations and led to a number of scientific publications.  Members of the fMRI research team from the Koelliker Hospital also use our findings as the subject of their lectures given at the University of Turin and at credit courses offered by other institutions as part of the “Educazione Continua in Medicina” (Continuing Medical Education) program run by the Italian Ministry of Health. Our research projects and training activities for members of the fMRI research team are made possible thanks to our partnerships with national and international clinics and research centers. Our international partners include:

 

Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

The Research Imaging Institute (RII) at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (TX), USA

Maastricht Brain Imaging Center, Department of Cognitive Neuroscience, Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Institute of Neurology, University College London, London, UK

Birmingham University Imaging Centre, Birmingham, UK

Students